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« The Organization as a Life Form | Main | No Need For Kings »

Our political Battle of Agincourt

As I sit here this morning my heart is heavy and I fear for my country, for my grandchildren, for my fellow citizens.  Immunity deals revealed, government-directed late Friday afternoon document dumps, media and government collusion to a degree few imagined; just more drips from what seems to be a never-ending flow of obvious corruption and criminality from the highest reaches of the federal government. 

To any honest observer this entire FBI – Justice Department “investigation” of Clinton’s use and destruction of a private email server is a joke, a charade, a kabuki dance for us deplorable rubes from fly-over country.  The fix has been in from the start. 

The concept of equal justice under the law lays tattered at our feet.  It seems there remains not a single soul in the FBI or Department of Justice whose personal honor has more worth than a paycheck.

When did we lose our freedom?  How did we lose our freedom?  And sadly why are so many quite willing to elevate people to royalty and to then eagerly bow before them?

Shakespeare coined many a phrase about scurvy politicians and cowards and they ring as true today as when they were written. 

But to my fellow deplorables and all who love freedom I offer another piece of Shakespearean wisdom. 

Let this be our cry.  Let this be our roar.  No matter how vile or whether we agree on other subjects, all who fight for freedom will be forever our band of brothers and sisters. 

This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day: then shall our names.
Familiar in his mouth as household words
Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remember'd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.

Let today be the beginning of our political Battle of Agincourt.  Let us never stop until we stand on the field of victory or lie in piles of smoldering corpses.  And this isn’t about Trump; he has a role to play and his election is important but our salvation lay in the hearts of millions of freedom loving Americans, hero’s all.  Do not look to others to lead; become the leader, grab the reins wherever you may be and make a stand.

Don’t listen to those who say we can’t win because we are outnumbered.  At the Battle of Agincourt the English fought in the mud; many naked and covered with feces from the rampant sickness.  They were outnumbered by at least 3 to 1.  And they lost 400 while killing at least 6,000 Frenchmen.

Never forget that “Cowards die many times before their deaths.  The valiant never taste of death but once.”

And for those who find Trump and us deplorables far too despicable to stand with and fight, I’ll again let Shakespeare provide the response:

“That he which hath no stomach to this fight,

   Let him depart; his passport shall be made,

   And crowns for convoy put into his purse;

   We would not die in that man's company

   That fears his fellowship to die with us.”

 We will let posterity determine the worth of their manhood’s.  Ours will stand long after theirs are but dust in the wind.

John Conlin is President and founder of E.I.C. Enterprises, www.EICEnterprises.org, a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to spreading a fact-based paradigm here and around the world primarily through K-12 education.  He is an expert in organizational design and change. 

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