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« The 3-tier system needs more beer distributors | Main | Holy Guacamole… continued »

Holy guacamole! Legal weed arrives in Colorado

Well in 2 days it will be weed-thirty in Colorado!  Yes that’s right, as of January 1, 2014 legal retail marijuana shops will be opening throughout Colorado.  Screw that medicinal bull; this is weed for those who simply desire it.  This became law via citizen initiative and won with strong support… 55% to 44% with almost 69% voter turnout.

Since this is a topic near and dear to many a beer wholesaler’s heart ;-), I thought I’d give all you non-Coloradoans an update on the Mile High scene.

First, it is interesting to watch and listen to people as they discuss the topic of legal marijuana.  You can hear a disconnect from many as they still think of the product as an illicit drug rather than the legal, state-regulated product that it will be in 2 days.  One would have probably heard the same types of things during the end of Prohibition.  But of course Prohibition lasted only a little over 13 years so for most adults they could remember a time when alcohol was legal.

That’s not the situation for marijuana.  There is no one alive who remembers a time when it wasn’t illegal… and for the Feds it remains a Schedule 1 drug… and for what that means I’ll let the Federal Drug Enforcement Agency’s website tell the tale (which you can find in its entirety here if you choose)

Drug Schedules

Drugs, substances, and certain chemicals used to make drugs are classified into five (5) distinct categories or schedules depending upon the drug’s acceptable medical use and the drug’s abuse or dependency potential. The abuse rate is a determinate factor in the scheduling of the drug; for example, Schedule I drugs are considered the most dangerous class of drugs with a high potential for abuse and potentially severe psychological and/or physical dependence. As the drug schedule changes-- Schedule II, Schedule III, etc., so does the abuse potential-- Schedule V drugs represents the least potential for abuse…

Schedule I

Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. Schedule I drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical dependence. Some examples of Schedule I drugs are:

heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote

So heroin, acid, ecstasy, Quaaludes, peyote and weed are classified the same by the federal government!  Yikes!  Schedule 2 drugs (by their reasoning not as dangerous as Schedule 1 drugs) include cocaine, meth, oxycodone (OxyContin) to name a few.  Earth to the Feds… coke, meth, and hillbilly heroin are one HECK of a lot more addictive and dangerous than weed. 

As a side note to all you parents out there… the Feds also include Ritalin as a Schedule 2 drug, i.e. in the same category as coke and meth.  Yet Ritalin is handed out like candy to children (generally boys) around the country… sorry, that’s just me temporarily getting on my soap-box again ;-)

Back to legal marijuana… since this product has never been legal in the memory of any living American, it is somewhat understandable that people still think of it as illegal and build their arguments from this perspective.  Denver City Council went round and round arguing that it should be illegal to smoke weed (on private property!) if anyone else could either smell it or see you doing it.  This foolishness was finally voted down but it shows how the illegal/legal mental divide will remain with us… probably for many years.

Of course under-age use is always a concern.  This one is harder to predict but my gut says most younger folks who want weed have no problem finding it right now… from middle school on up.  Some have predicted a rise in older use since they long ago lost their connection ;-) and I’d have to guess this might be the biggest user impact of legal weed. 

And of course there is that old belief that marijuana is a “gate-way” drug that leads to harder drug use.  In a counter-intuitive fashion, I think it might just go the other way.  When marijuana is illegal you must purchase it from someone who in all likelihood has quick and easy connections to those selling (and using) other drugs.  With legal weed this connection is broken.  Someone buying legal weed will no longer be dealing with people who will readily sell them other drugs.  At least that’s my guess right now.

In addition, one comedian was talking about legal weed and teenage use and his take was that legal marijuana will end up LOWERING teenage/youth use… when the kids sit around and watch grandma and granddad passing the bong, it will change the whole ‘illicit’ attraction.  He said it much funnier than that though ;-)

This transitionary period (forward if the experiment works or backwards if it becomes a huge failure) will be one of working out a lot of kinks and contradictions.  Since marijuana is illegal from a federal perspective, the weed industry can’t find any bankers who will accept their business… this is a problem for the “medical” marijuana retailers in every state too.  Financial institutions can’t knowingly do business with any individual/organization who is committing a crime.  Thus out of self-preservation, the banks refuse to do business with the weed industry.  To solve this problem Washington State is proposing the creation of a state-owned bank solely for the weed industry.  Many think this too is destined to fail since from the Feds perspective, it doesn’t matter who owns the bank… knowingly doing business with criminals is still against federal banking and financial law… and every one of these retail establishments, their grow operations, and every consumer is labeled a criminal under federal law.

Employers in Colorado and across the country can still fire you from your job for smoking during off-hours, even though you are using a now legal product... and using it on your time.  I personally don’t think this one will stand but that’s the law right now.  Expect the marijuana lobby to respond to this injustice with alcohol as their foil… “Perhaps we should pass a law where an employer can fire you for consuming a beer or two after work or over the weekend.”  The beverage alcohol industry should be prepared to address this since it most certainly is coming.  It will be interesting to see which side NBWA and state associations take on this one.

Weed might be legal in the state BUT on federal land (think national forests, BLM land, and national monuments)… if you smoke you are breaking the law and can be arrested.

Smoking in public is also against the law as is in public establishments, i.e. bars and restaurants, concert venues, etc.  But I think any analysis of reality will tell you this will rarely be enforced.  I find it difficult to believe cops are going to be on the prowl outside (or inside) of bars looking for folks who are lighting up a quick one.

And a quick one it will probably be… A letter writer to the local paper noted that the image of people standing around smoking joint after joint is based on the past.  This legal weed packs a punch. 

As a side note, a number of years ago I heard an agricultural geneticist talk about the incredible advances in the potency of marijuana that was achieved by a bunch of backyard geneticists.  To put it in perspective he noted that if similar advances were made with vegetables, one would be growing tomatoes that were four feet in diameter and watermelons twenty feet long!  I’d have to guess this trend will only continue.

Back to the letter writer… this writer explained it is far too expensive and far too powerful for this type of use… this is the infamous one or two-toke material.  Folks will grab a quick hit or two and then go about their business… or so this letter writer’s prediction.

In fact there are products called vaporizers (and others) that allow smokers to capitalize on this feature.  The magazine High Times did a review of some, which you can find here.  Here’s their lead paragraph…

Since our first vaporizer buyer's guide in 2011, a plethora of new pen-sized vapes have hit the market – offering cannabis consumers a stealthy, convenient way to get high in almost any location or situation. But with so many options, how can John Q. Stoner know which ones are worthy of their cash and stash, and which ones are worthy of the trash? Well, fear not, loyal readers – that’s where we come in. Our diligent staff has reviewed and rated (on a scale of 1 to 5) 15 top vapor pens so that you can get ripped without getting ripped off. We’ve provided vital specs on each of the following devices and judged them based on seven criteria: affordability, durability, versatility, high, stealth, health, and ease of refill. But first, some general info ...

This whole legal world should be an interesting experiment, eh?  Weed-based tours are already set up for January 1… think craft beer tours… and this could be a pretty big out-of-state attraction.  I’m certain in the very near-term we will see combined tours… weed and craft brewers.  I’d also have to guess car-based trips to our fair state will be going up substantially in the near term… with many going home with a glove-box full of high quality weed.  It is only legal to purchase (and possess) up to one ounce… but there are a lot of stores and it is not illegal to go back to the same store multiple times… so going home with a 6-month supply probably won’t be too tough… or if you want to sell back home, you can probably pay for your entire vacation with the proceeds.

Law enforcement around the country is already complaining that Colorado (and Washington State) are flooding their states with marijuana.  Assuming this experiment doesn’t go badly, I’d have to guess legal marijuana will quickly be adopted by many more states.  As the beer, wine, and spirits industries know so well… even folks who don’t like the product LOVE the tax revenue.  I can easily see state legislatures complaining that they are getting all of the impact of semi-legal marijuana without any of the tax dollars that come along with it.  Call me a cynic but I’d bet the dollars will win every time ;-)

From the beverage alcohol industry’s perspective… what does legal weed mean for beer, wine, and spirits sales?  Heck if I know!  If anything I’d guess perhaps a slight downward push but it is hard to say.  Are stoners more likely to stay home and drink or simply stay home or head to the local on-premise establishment?  We’ll know in a year or two.

Is there opportunity for distributors here?  From your present business model I’d have to guess not.  I simply don’t see a need for warehousing and distribution of this product.  There is though A LOT of money to be made… whether it’s grow operations or retail (or perhaps retail chain?) I’d guess folks are going to make a ton of money.  Probably be a little Wild West aspect to it for a while.  Do you jump in or not?  I think this will first be decided by your feelings on the Prohibition-aspect… is this an illicit drug or a legal, state-regulated product?  Your call.  In a week or two, the view from retail.

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